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APPLY FOR UNADVERTISED JOBS

The Job Hunt Plan with Fire Power. No need to wait till you spot your favourite company advertising somewhere! Approach them and let them know they need you.

Fire Power Job Hunt Plan

Apply for a job that hasn’t been advertised! This improves your chances of getting it.

If a job hasn’t been advertised, fewer people will know about it. This means fewer people will apply, which means less competition for that job.

Social media trends and technology advances allow companies to find applicants without listing a position. Some companies don’t like to advertise on job sites because of the cost.

Employers have found that job listings on free sites result in tons of unsuitable candidates who need to be screened. This increases the cost of recruitment.

Many employers and recruiters use social media platforms to find candidates instead. They often screen applicants on platforms such as LinkedIn and Google+ as there’s no cost.

Improving your visibility can increase opportunity.

Attract the Job Market

Good job hunters create opportunities for jobs to find them.

Job hunters must be visible and actively engaged with finding work or they fall to the competition.

Try these tips to make you more visible:

Get Out There!

  • Networking Turns You into Fresh News

A network is a group of people you know, the people they know, and the people they know… and so on.

Everyone has a network. Ask your network about unadvertised jobs they may know of. They could let you know how to apply for that job before it gets advertised.

  • Cold Calling

“Cold calling” means contacting companies directly to ask about vacancies. If your approach is right, they’ll listen. If not, chances are high that someone may be rude. No worries!

Cold calling can be scary, but most people react well and even offer encouragement and further leads. If you’re polite, very few people in business will bite your head off. Cold calling is worth all the trouble in the world if it gets you a job, or even just an interview.

8 Job Hunt Tips

1. Join industry-related groups. Join associations, Chambers of Commerce, meet-up groups, networks, Toastmasters, etc., Start building contacts before you need them. If you have expertise to share, volunteer to be a speaker.

2. Be a source of information in your industry. Send individual contacts within your network links to articles of interest once or twice a year. Let your name be associated with good information and make yourself seen as a valuable, well-read resource. Don’t spam them!

3. Talk to insiders or stalk them on social media! Keep up to speed with what is happening in their spaces so you know how to adapt or increase your efforts. Break out of your usual pattern and focus on learning something new. Your next big opportunity may be in a space you never thought possible, but you’ll never know if you don’t explore.

4. Pay attention to the news. Stay on top of any local business journals and TV news for information on what’s happening with companies in your area. If you hear someone interviewed on radio, send them a note that you appreciated what they had to say and would like to get together over coffee to share ideas.

You must know what scarce skills and trending industries are in order to understand how to use them to your advantage.

Find Jobs Online in Trending Industries

5. Search company “Careers” pages. Research and target companies you are interested in — most companies will post on their own website and never go to outside job boards or recruiters. Some companies have internal referral programs in place, so existing employees make referrals and remove the need for the company to conduct a formal search.

6. Build and maintain relationships with recruiters. Update your CV every few months so you can send the latest version to them.

7. Use LinkedIn wisely. Keep your profile up-to-date, and refresh it regularly. Join groups and participate in discussions so people become familiar with your name and look for you. Recruiters and companies often purchase memberships that give them a ‘back door’ to see who is active in their field and what they are saying, so be certain to keep your discussions positive and constructive.


LinkedIn Help

Power Words for Your Cover Letter, CV and LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn Trends for South Africans

If you’d like me to take a look at your profile, drop your link in the comments section blow and check for my feedback.


8. Target carefully.

  • Pick the companies where you would like to work;
  • do your research on why you want to work there;
  • identify those things that you can relate to and like about the company;
  • identify the decision makers, or people high up enough in the company to know the decision makers, and connect with them on LinkedIn. Send them something they will appreciate: an article or anything that would help them, not you.
  • Don’t ask them for anything in your first few communications, this will make them want to ask about you.

Make someone’s life easier and eventually you’ll be the first person they think of when a job becomes available.

More action plans and great tips

Looking for Employment? Plan Your Career in 6 Steps

What Are Soft and Hard Skills? What Skills do Employers Look For?

What Are Soft and Hard Skills? What Skills do Employers Look For?

Qualified? 5 Tech Tips for Finding Work

How to Ask For a Job via Social Media

Link Your Studies to Job Opportunities : Scarce Skills

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comments

Comments (3)

    1. I’m no fan of recruiters so if you can’t find a job as one, in my opinion, it’s probably a good thing! 😉
      The biggest change you can make is to consider how you contribute to the world and use social media to share ideas, inspiration and industry insights.
      No one is looking for a profile, they are looking for a person – so make your information engaging and interesting.

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